Tag Archives: sustainability

Highland Beach One-Hour Cleanup

Recently, I went on a beach walk and did a one-hour beach cleanup. I started at the northernmost entrance to Spanish River Park, where there is limited street parking on Spanish River Road. I walked north towards Highland Beach.

Overall, the beach was relatively clean, though there were a few concentrations of trash, and plenty of disturbing finds.

Though it was overcast, it was an eerily beautiful beach day.

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Endless.

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The gray sky bled into the gray sea, and without the help of a sailboat I wouldn’t have been able to tell where the horizon was.

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The sea was also silent, a rare sight on the east coast of Florida.

The Findings

Scary Findings (Or Reasons Why You Should Keep Your Shoes On at the Beach!)

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A piece of glass sticking straight up out of the sand. This was found in the park part of the beach, and is the reason why glass is prohibited on most beaches.
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I think this is a needle used for blood tests. It is hard to see in the picture, but if you look closely at the top of the teal plastic, you can see the needlepoint. Ouchies!
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A rusted, upturned bottle cap.

 

Other Findings

Continue reading Highland Beach One-Hour Cleanup

Hallandale Beach Is About to Ban Styrofoam

Way to go Hallandale Beach, Florida! A few days ago, city commissioners voted to approve the ban of polystyrene foam (Styrofoam) at the beach. This measure will hopefully be finalized by a final vote on May 6th, 2015.

If this vote goes through, Hallandale Beach will be the first city in Broward County to implement such a measure, and the second in the South Florida area behind Miami Beach.

If you are caught with a polystyrene foam cooler, cup, or anything else, you will receive a $50 fine once the ban is in full effect, which is expected to be in mid-summer.

The mayor of Hallandale has also set aside $50,000 towards an anti-litter campaign.

Hopefully Hallandale Beach and Miami Beach will set the precedent for the rest of South Florida, and other city commissions will begin implementing their own polystyrene foam bans!

Polystyrene foam takes a very long time to decompose, and it is very difficult and costly to recycle properly. Removing it from the beach, and ultimately from popular use, will help to protect the ecosystems!

 

Welcome to the Beach Review!

Welcome to The Beach Review! It seemed appropriate to launch The Beach Review on the first day of summer, June 21st, 2014, when the days are at their longest and the sun is at its brightest.

Each week, TBR will highlight different beaches beginning in South Florida- the famous and the lesser known- as well as provide information on beach safety, wildlife, and responsible tourism. The Review will feature photography of local sunrises, sunsets, and more beach scenery for you to enjoy. We will also focus on pollution, endangered species, and ways to protect the fragile ecosystems of the region.

If you have never been to South Florida, you may not realize how many different beach options and experiences are available. Each beach has its own vibe and offers something different. From Tequesta to Key West, there is something for everyone.

Whether you are a local planning a daytrip or a first time beach goer flying into Florida, it may be overwhelming to pick which beach you want to go to. What does each beach offer? How crowded are the beaches? Which ones are clean? Where’s a good place to find sea shells? Where’s a good place for sand sculpting? Where can I park? What are the hours? What can I bring?

All of these questions and more will be answered here at The Beach Review.

Explore the beaches of South Florida and beyond with The Beach Review, where we bring the beach to you. You never know where we are, or where we will be, so enjoy the journey!

Follow us on social media for a real time look at what we are up to!

 

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Our First Beach Cleanup- The Analysis

The Beach Review celebrated the official first day of summer with our first beach cleanup at South Inlet Park in Boca Raton, Florida!

We met on the morning of June 21st, 2014 with one mission in mind… fill up the bio-degradable trash bags and clean up the beach!

What we found was disturbing.

When you hear about beach cleanups from other people, you think you know what to expect; you think you will know what you will find. But as with most things in life, hearing about something versus actually doing it  are two completely different things, and a beach cleanup is no exception.

The best analogy that comes to mind of what a beach cleanup is like is the same experience that you have when snorkeling underwater. At first, nothing is there, but with a single blink of the eye, the creatures of the ocean reveal themselves to you- fish swim beneath you, swim next to you, swim all around you. With a beach cleanup, at first you look out at the glistening morning sand, the persistent, yet quiet break of the waves, and that is all you see. When you put your gloves on and hold that trash bag in your hand, suddenly things begin appearing, and before you know it, you are overwhelmed by the shear amount of garbage that is strewn carelessly about this paradise.

The Issues

There are two glaring issues of this beach that seem to contribute to the amount of trash on the beach, besides the typical lackadaisical beach goer.

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A mixture of fishing line, small plastics, and other litter.

Issue 1: Fishermen

Fishermen flock to this location because of the ease of access to inlet fishing, which is basically a superhighway of marine life from the ocean into or out of the intracoastal waterway.

The main problem with fishermen is fishing line. Fishing line takes 600 years to decompose, and is often mistaken as food by birds, manatees, and sea turtles. Ingestion of fishing line is often fatal.

We found copious amounts of fishing line tangled in the jetty, left on the shoreline, and buried in the sand.

Why? Yes, someone is just carelessly leaving it behind, but this beach does not have a fishing line disposal receptacle! A popular fishing spot with no fishing line receptacle? Ridiculous!

The Beach Review has contacted the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program (MRRP) that is run through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in hopes of trying to get a proper receptacle there to hopefully curtail the frivolous disposal of fishing line.  We will keep you updated on our progress.

The only fishing line disposal location in Boca Raton that we found on the MRRP website is at 7 Seas Bait and Tackle at 1308 NW 2nd Avenue, Boca Raton, 33432. Please take your monofilament fishing line there so it can be recycled.

Issue 2: The Dredge

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An unrecognizable, mangled aluminum can, with very sharp edges.

The city owned dredge is in place to transfer sand at the bottom of the inlet so that large boats can still traverse safely through the inlet. According to the dredge’s website, “The material dredged from the inlet is placed above the mean high water line of the beaches 500 feet south of the southern jetty of the inlet.”

This location is a main part of the South Inlet Park Beach. When the dredge is off, many people walk directly across where the dredge spews its “materials” in minimal shoes or bare feet because it’s the beach! It’s sand! Not so fast…

The “material dredged” is not just sand, but also any piece of trash that has been deposited into the ocean and found a temporary resting place at the bottom of the inlet.

We found an unbelievable amount of trash that was thrown out of the dredge. How do we know it was from the dredge? Because of the location of the debris. When the dredge spews the sand etc. from the bottom of the inlet and then is turned off, it leaves a distinct pattern of wet sand and water runoff over the dry interior sand.

It also appeared that the machine was shredding certain items, specifically aluminum cans. A whole aluminum can usually won’t cut someone’s foot, but shredded aluminum most definitely will. Most of what we saw were iceberg cans, meaning that you would pull a piece that was slightly protruding out of the sand’s surface, and instead of pulling a small piece, you would actually pull out a much larger piece that was hidden by the sand.

Do not go near the dredge when it is on. It is an extremely dangerous machine and we saw first hand that it is not just sand and water coming out of it!

What the dredge brings to the surface (literally) are past violations against nature. The area where the dredge is depositing materials  should be given extra care by those who are responsible for the maintenance of this beach (it is run by Palm Beach County), or for any other group that wants to do a beach cleanup in this location. As dangerous as the trash on the beach is, it is a second chance to remove it from the environmental equation all together.

Everyone should pay extra attention to the trash around them, because all it takes is a split second to step on the wrong thing, and your beach trip is ruined.

Other Items Found

  • The “find of the day” went to the abandoned baby doll.
  • Small plastics, specifically straws, tops to children’s drinks, plastic silverware, etc.  Small plastics are eaten by sea birds and turtles, and can cause them great harm by blocking their digestive tract.
  • Fragments of rubber and tires
  • A whole shoe sole
  • A variety of fabrics, from terry cloth to mesh
  • Bottle caps
  • Abandoned children’s sand toys
  • Guitar string
  • Broken glass
  • Plastic bags
  • Closed zip-tie
  • Shotgun shell (?!?)
  • Cables and electrical wires
  • Styrofoam cooler chunks
  • Food packaging

On your next trip to the beach, be cognizant of what you are bringing with you and what you are leaving behind. Remember, you are a visitor in the full-time home of other beings.