Tag Archives: sea turtles

#TurtleTuesday: Man O’War vs. Litter

PicMonkey Collage (1)

On the left, you will see a favorite sea turtle delicacy known as the Portuguese Man O’War.

On the right, you will see a piece of garbage I found washed up on the shore.

Look how similar these look! It is easy to see how a sea turtle might confuse this garbage as food.

Please keep the beaches clean and dispose of your trash properly! Protect the sea turtles!

Highland Beach One-Hour Cleanup

Recently, I went on a beach walk and did a one-hour beach cleanup. I started at the northernmost entrance to Spanish River Park, where there is limited street parking on Spanish River Road. I walked north towards Highland Beach.

Overall, the beach was relatively clean, though there were a few concentrations of trash, and plenty of disturbing finds.

Though it was overcast, it was an eerily beautiful beach day.

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Endless.

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The gray sky bled into the gray sea, and without the help of a sailboat I wouldn’t have been able to tell where the horizon was.

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The sea was also silent, a rare sight on the east coast of Florida.

The Findings

Scary Findings (Or Reasons Why You Should Keep Your Shoes On at the Beach!)

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A piece of glass sticking straight up out of the sand. This was found in the park part of the beach, and is the reason why glass is prohibited on most beaches.
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I think this is a needle used for blood tests. It is hard to see in the picture, but if you look closely at the top of the teal plastic, you can see the needlepoint. Ouchies!
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A rusted, upturned bottle cap.

 

Other Findings

Continue reading Highland Beach One-Hour Cleanup

6 Reasons to do a Beach Cleanup Before Summer’s Over

For most of the US, summer is winding down. Soon, the kids will be back at school and the heat and waves of summer 2015 will be a precious memory.

But for those of you who are still planning beach vacations, who are venturing south for the winter, or who are lucky to live near the beach full time, here are six reasons why you should participate in a beach cleanup before summer is officially over (or really whenever you can)!

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Help protect sea turtle hatchlings and other marine life

Sea turtle season doesn’t end until October, so there are still plenty of hatchlings waiting to emerge and find their way to the ocean. We know that their journey is already hard enough, so let’s make sure that their path to the ocean is as easy as possible. Despite sea turtle nests being marked off and protected, I always find a lot of trash around the nests. Not only does this litter pose a threat to the hatchlings, but it also threatens any shore birds that search the sand for their food. The tide brings in a lot of garbage, let’s make sure it doesn’t go back out!

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Make great friends and memories

Whether you get a group of your friends together to go cleanup your favorite beach spot, or join one of the many great organizations that coordinates beach cleanups each month, you can make positive memories with friends old and new. If protecting the ocean and the environment is something you are passionate about, get outside of your comfort zone and join a group cleanup. It is a great way to meet other people who share your passions. I have met some of the nicest and friendliest people attending cleanups. People are always stoked to meet someone else who actively shares their passion for the environment!

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Beach cleanups are great exercise

Carrying buckets of garbage in the sand is an excellent workout that is sure to get your heart pumping and your body sweating. If you don’t have a grabber, which I highly recommend if you plan on frequently doing beach cleanups, you will be doing a lot of squats to pick up garbage. Most organized beach cleanups last about two hours, a great amount of time for a workout out in the fresh, salty air. It’s a fantastic way to start the day!

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You can be the change

It’s easy to get caught up in our busy lives and get stuck behind our computer’s keyboard. If you want to see a difference in the world, be the difference. It’s as simple as that. Participating in a beach cleanup is a rewarding experience, and if you have never done one, I am sure you will be shocked by the amount of garbage you will find.

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Beach cleanups are a great time for introspection

Whether you are cleaning up the beach on your own or with a group, a beach cleanup is a great time to analyze your own choices when it comes to both consumption and disposal. When you actually see first hand the amount of garbage carelessly left behind, it may lead you to reexamine your own choices. Being conscious of our own consumption, and what happens to our own garbage can lead us to make changes that lower our own footprint.

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You can raise awareness

Raising awareness about the plight of the fragile shore ecosystems is important. Many people thoughtlessly extinguish their cigarette butts in the sand, and leave them behind, probably thinking it’s just me, no biggie. But when many people adopt this mentality, that is when the beaches become, for lack of a better word, gross. I think it’s a great idea to photograph garbage as you cleanup. Take pictures of the amount of cigarette butts you find, or the weirdest item you find. Then share, share, share! Share across all your social media platforms! People by nature are very visual creatures, so actually showing instead of telling is a fantastic way to raise awareness to the issue of beach litter. Maybe, just maybe, someone will think twice before leaving behind a styrofoam cup, or not disposing of fishing line properly because of an image or experience you share.

Beach cleanups are a ton of fun, and even though summer is almost over, many groups organize beach cleanups year round. Whenever you get the opportunity, I strongly urge you to spend a morning or afternoon doing a beach cleanup!

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Check out some of these South Florida organizations to see when they are doing their next beach cleanup:

Surfrider Foundation Chapters worldwide

Sea Angels South Florida, monthly cleanups

Stoked on Salt South Florida

The Beach Review Action Committee South Florida

Also check out local meet-ups on Meetup.com.

Be sure to mark your calendar for Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup on September 19th, 2015!

If you run an organization that facilitates beach cleanups, feel free to comment with a link to your website!

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Our First Beach Cleanup- The Analysis

The Beach Review celebrated the official first day of summer with our first beach cleanup at South Inlet Park in Boca Raton, Florida!

We met on the morning of June 21st, 2014 with one mission in mind… fill up the bio-degradable trash bags and clean up the beach!

What we found was disturbing.

When you hear about beach cleanups from other people, you think you know what to expect; you think you will know what you will find. But as with most things in life, hearing about something versus actually doing it  are two completely different things, and a beach cleanup is no exception.

The best analogy that comes to mind of what a beach cleanup is like is the same experience that you have when snorkeling underwater. At first, nothing is there, but with a single blink of the eye, the creatures of the ocean reveal themselves to you- fish swim beneath you, swim next to you, swim all around you. With a beach cleanup, at first you look out at the glistening morning sand, the persistent, yet quiet break of the waves, and that is all you see. When you put your gloves on and hold that trash bag in your hand, suddenly things begin appearing, and before you know it, you are overwhelmed by the shear amount of garbage that is strewn carelessly about this paradise.

The Issues

There are two glaring issues of this beach that seem to contribute to the amount of trash on the beach, besides the typical lackadaisical beach goer.

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A mixture of fishing line, small plastics, and other litter.

Issue 1: Fishermen

Fishermen flock to this location because of the ease of access to inlet fishing, which is basically a superhighway of marine life from the ocean into or out of the intracoastal waterway.

The main problem with fishermen is fishing line. Fishing line takes 600 years to decompose, and is often mistaken as food by birds, manatees, and sea turtles. Ingestion of fishing line is often fatal.

We found copious amounts of fishing line tangled in the jetty, left on the shoreline, and buried in the sand.

Why? Yes, someone is just carelessly leaving it behind, but this beach does not have a fishing line disposal receptacle! A popular fishing spot with no fishing line receptacle? Ridiculous!

The Beach Review has contacted the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program (MRRP) that is run through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in hopes of trying to get a proper receptacle there to hopefully curtail the frivolous disposal of fishing line.  We will keep you updated on our progress.

The only fishing line disposal location in Boca Raton that we found on the MRRP website is at 7 Seas Bait and Tackle at 1308 NW 2nd Avenue, Boca Raton, 33432. Please take your monofilament fishing line there so it can be recycled.

Issue 2: The Dredge

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An unrecognizable, mangled aluminum can, with very sharp edges.

The city owned dredge is in place to transfer sand at the bottom of the inlet so that large boats can still traverse safely through the inlet. According to the dredge’s website, “The material dredged from the inlet is placed above the mean high water line of the beaches 500 feet south of the southern jetty of the inlet.”

This location is a main part of the South Inlet Park Beach. When the dredge is off, many people walk directly across where the dredge spews its “materials” in minimal shoes or bare feet because it’s the beach! It’s sand! Not so fast…

The “material dredged” is not just sand, but also any piece of trash that has been deposited into the ocean and found a temporary resting place at the bottom of the inlet.

We found an unbelievable amount of trash that was thrown out of the dredge. How do we know it was from the dredge? Because of the location of the debris. When the dredge spews the sand etc. from the bottom of the inlet and then is turned off, it leaves a distinct pattern of wet sand and water runoff over the dry interior sand.

It also appeared that the machine was shredding certain items, specifically aluminum cans. A whole aluminum can usually won’t cut someone’s foot, but shredded aluminum most definitely will. Most of what we saw were iceberg cans, meaning that you would pull a piece that was slightly protruding out of the sand’s surface, and instead of pulling a small piece, you would actually pull out a much larger piece that was hidden by the sand.

Do not go near the dredge when it is on. It is an extremely dangerous machine and we saw first hand that it is not just sand and water coming out of it!

What the dredge brings to the surface (literally) are past violations against nature. The area where the dredge is depositing materials  should be given extra care by those who are responsible for the maintenance of this beach (it is run by Palm Beach County), or for any other group that wants to do a beach cleanup in this location. As dangerous as the trash on the beach is, it is a second chance to remove it from the environmental equation all together.

Everyone should pay extra attention to the trash around them, because all it takes is a split second to step on the wrong thing, and your beach trip is ruined.

Other Items Found

  • The “find of the day” went to the abandoned baby doll.
  • Small plastics, specifically straws, tops to children’s drinks, plastic silverware, etc.  Small plastics are eaten by sea birds and turtles, and can cause them great harm by blocking their digestive tract.
  • Fragments of rubber and tires
  • A whole shoe sole
  • A variety of fabrics, from terry cloth to mesh
  • Bottle caps
  • Abandoned children’s sand toys
  • Guitar string
  • Broken glass
  • Plastic bags
  • Closed zip-tie
  • Shotgun shell (?!?)
  • Cables and electrical wires
  • Styrofoam cooler chunks
  • Food packaging

On your next trip to the beach, be cognizant of what you are bringing with you and what you are leaving behind. Remember, you are a visitor in the full-time home of other beings.

The Trials of a Baby Sea Turtle

It’s a life or death journey that only one out of every thousand survive. It’s the moment to sink, or to swim. This is the trek of the hatchling.

To humans, it is not a great distance from the edge of the sand to the ocean surf. To a baby sea turtle, this is the longest, most significant journey of their lives.

Sea turtles lay their eggs, and then leave them behind forever, never knowing how many, if any, of their next-gen will make it to the sea. After incubating underneath the sand, the babies will hatch, and crawl just beneath the surface in unison. When the sand temperature is just right, the hatchlings will emerge from the sand, looking for visual clues to make their way to the sea.

Meanwhile, natural predators standby waiting to feast on the disoriented hatchlings, picking off a significant portion of the hopeful swimmers.

Hatchlings use clues such as the white caps of the waves and the natural light of the horizon line to adjust their course in the right direction. This is why human lights can be so detrimental to the hatchlings trying to find the ocean; streetlights, houselights, carlights, or flashlights can distract a hatchling from its natural path.

Another issue for hatchlings is debris in their path. When a mother turtle dropped off her eggs, she probably chose a spot that was clear. Overtime with the changing tides, many different things, from seaweed to human litter, can wash up and ruin the hatchlings’ course.

Below are some images that present different angles around a single protected sea turtle’s nest. It begs the question of how these tiny hatchlings will be able to make their way to the ocean against these physical obstacles.

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The sea turtle’s nest.

 

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Zoom out and begin to see some of the trash mixed with the seaweed.

 

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Zoom further out to see the different types of plastics just feet away from the turtle’s nest.

 

How will the hatchlings overcome this? Why does this have to be another obstacle on an already difficult journey?
How will the hatchlings overcome this? Why does this have to be another obstacle on an already difficult journey?

 

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More plastic in the hatchling’s path.

 

Think about where your trash goes.  Don’t be the reason why 999 baby hatchlings won’t make it to the ocean.

 

Gumbo Limbo Environmental Complex

If you are looking for a fun, educational experience near the beach, and you love sea turtles, then you must check out Gumbo Limbo Environmental Complex in Boca Raton, Florida.

Located on A1A across from Red Reef Park, Gumbo Limbo gives you an up-close look at what is going on under the sea and then some. The complex consists of a butterfly garden, an indoor nature center, classrooms, a turtle rehabilitation center, large outdoor aquariums, and a mangrove boardwalk. There is also a gift shop.The twenty-acre property is situated on the intracoastal, so whether you go through the butterfly garden or the mangrove boardwalk, you will be able to see the beautiful waterway.

The Shore-t Story

Who it is good for: The whole family

Cost: $5 suggested donation, they are a non-profit

Time to visit: One hour to three hours

Parking: Free onsite parking for the environmental complex only; no beach parking

Food: Vending machines dispense bottled water and canned gatorade; No picnicking allowed

*Tip* Park at Red Reef Park and walk across A1A if you plan on going to the beach (Parking is $16 weekdays, $18 on weekends and holidays). You can also park across from Red Reef Park at the Red Reef West Park, use the same entrance as the Red Reef Public Golf Course. Parking there is $2 an hour weekdays and $3 an hour on weekends. There is access from the parking lot to Gumbo Limbo’s boardwalk.

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Entrance to Gumbo Limbo from Red Reef Golf Course parking lot

The Nature Center

Throughout the indoor/outdoor nature center, you will see a variety of wonderful nature exhibits. There is a gopher tortoise exhibit, a butterfly nursery, local plants potted throughout, and other thought-provoking exhibits that focus on how humans impact the environment.

The Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Center

One of the greatest things about Gumbo Limbo is the work that they do in terms of sea turtle rehabilitation and conservation. In 2010, their new rehabilitation center opened, a state-of-the art facility that provides refuge for sick and injured sea turtles.

Talk to any of the volunteers or employees, and they will gladly teach you about all of the turtle patients receiving treatment. There is even a window where you can watch a turtle receive treatment. I witnessed a turtle receiving IV fluids. It is heartbreaking to see turtles missing parts of their shell due to boat collision accidents, or their bodies covered in fibropapillomatosis. However, it is wonderful that places such as this exist to offer these sea turtles a second chance.

*Tip* No flash photography is allowed in the sea turtle rehabilitation facility.

 

Sea Tanks

The newest additions to Gumbo Limbo are their sea tanks. There are four large tanks, each of which represents a different coastal ecosystem. Two shallow tanks are in one pavilion, and two large tanks are in an adjacent pavilion.

One shallow tank represents a mangrove ecosystem, and the other a nearshore reef. In this room you will see stingrays cruise by, fish, and other sea surprises!

In the pavilion with the large tanks, there is a tropical coral reef tank and a shipwreck tank! You can marvel at the beautiful colors of the coral reef, or gasp when a baby shark swims up to the glass right in front of you. This is a great way to show kids what is going on beneath the waves. A corner of the shipwreck tank has a step for little kids to use so that they can easily peek through the glass.

*Tip* Visit Red Reef Park in the morning and enjoy the beach and artificial reef, and then walk to Gumbo Limbo during the heat of the day.

The Mangrove Boardwalk

The boardwalk at Gumbo Limbo is a peaceful, shaded quarter-mile path that takes you through the mystical mangroves. Go slowly, tread quietly, and you will be surprised at the abundance and diversity of wildlife to see.

 

There are many amazing plants throughout the boardwalk as well, from mangroves to the eponymous gumbo limbos, from strangler figs to cabbage palms.

 

One of the most incredible things about the boardwalk is the forty-foot tall observation tower that takes you above the coastal hammock to give you a bird’s eye view of surrounding Boca Raton.

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Overall, Gumbo Limbo Environmental Complex is a great day trip whether you are alone, a couple, or a family. When you enter the hammock boardwalk you quickly forget that you are in the heart of coastal Boca Raton.

To learn more about Gumbo Limbo or to volunteer, visit their website.

Find out about the problems we discovered on our walk along the Gumbo Limbo Coastal Hammock boardwalk.