Tag Archives: featured

Welcome to the Beach Review!

Welcome to The Beach Review! It seemed appropriate to launch The Beach Review on the first day of summer, June 21st, 2014, when the days are at their longest and the sun is at its brightest.

Each week, TBR will highlight different beaches beginning in South Florida- the famous and the lesser known- as well as provide information on beach safety, wildlife, and responsible tourism. The Review will feature photography of local sunrises, sunsets, and more beach scenery for you to enjoy. We will also focus on pollution, endangered species, and ways to protect the fragile ecosystems of the region.

If you have never been to South Florida, you may not realize how many different beach options and experiences are available. Each beach has its own vibe and offers something different. From Tequesta to Key West, there is something for everyone.

Whether you are a local planning a daytrip or a first time beach goer flying into Florida, it may be overwhelming to pick which beach you want to go to. What does each beach offer? How crowded are the beaches? Which ones are clean? Where’s a good place to find sea shells? Where’s a good place for sand sculpting? Where can I park? What are the hours? What can I bring?

All of these questions and more will be answered here at The Beach Review.

Explore the beaches of South Florida and beyond with The Beach Review, where we bring the beach to you. You never know where we are, or where we will be, so enjoy the journey!

Follow us on social media for a real time look at what we are up to!

 

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What is Responsible Tourism?

Responsible tourism is about visiting a wonderful location and its local population without impacting it in a negative way.

It is about leaving only footprints in the sand behind, and taking away only memories.

Also known as “sustainable tourism” or “ecotourism,” some people believe that this concept is unattainable, that this is an oxymoron. How can you promote travel and economy that will undoubtedly impact the local environment, while also protecting the environment?

In order for responsible tourism to work, it has to be a collective effort by both the visitors and the locals. Even the smallest consideration, such as picking up your own trash, not leaving cigarette butts in the sand, or even wearing the right suntan lotion can help the environment’s future.

Local businesses and hotels  take measures to be  environmentally friendly as well. Some have implemented green programs, such as putting water-saving fixtures in the bathroom, or asking their guests to ask for new towels only if absolutely  necessary. The Beach Review will seek out these establishments so you can know the eco-conscious hotels and resorts to stay at.

A little bit of environmental consciousness can go a long way. It is also contagious.

The leading scientists all believe that we must act now if we want to  stop global warming. Those of us who have the deeply engrained desire to travel appreciate the world around us, and want our future generations to enjoy the same beauty.

Go green. Travel green. Practice responsible tourism.

 

Marine Debris: In the Mangroves

More than just water moves in and out with the tides. If you walk along the coast at low tide, whether you are near the ocean or the intracoastal, the water will leave behind a troubling portrait of its health, as if asking for help or even mercy.

Moving with the currents is the trash that ends up in the waters, whether it originated directly from the beaches, from marine vessels, or from even further inland.

Below you will see a small snapshot of what is occurring in the mangrove ecosystem.

mangrove trash debris litter

This photo was taken along the mangrove boardwalk at Gumbo Limbo Environmental Complex in Boca Raton. Each red rectangle shows a piece of trash that was deposited in the mangroves. In one small frame, we were able to capture nine pieces of trash.

You see a chunk of styrofoam in the top left corner, and aluminum cans and plastic bottles strewn about. These are some of the absolute worst things that can be thrown into the ocean because of their low decomposition rates. (It takes a small styrofoam cup about 50 years to decompose; 200 years for an aluminum can to decompose; 450 years for a plastic bottle to decompose.)

More than likely these were deposited here indirectly, meaning that someone probably wasn’t sitting in the mangroves drinking beer and bottled water. These were pushed into the mangroves and left behind by the high tide.

The mangroves are home to many creatures, from birds to foxes, from crabs to spiders. They are safe houses for fish, crustaceans, and shellfish to reproduce. Snapper, snook, tarpon, jack, sheepshead, oyster, shrimp, and many other valuable marine species find their food amongst the mangroves. Pelicans and other coastal birds use the branches of the mangroves as their rookeries.

What would you do if your neighbor put his or her trash on your lawn, instead of in the proper receptacle? Even if it was just a couple of cans, or a plastic bottle? You wouldn’t stand for it, so why should we stand for this treatment of a valuable ecosystem?

Mangroves are important, fragile ecosystems that help protect coastal regions from erosion.  Mangrove roots naturally filter the water from pollutants, but in no way can they self-regulate the trash that accumulates there.

Poisoning the mangroves with human waste will lead to the imminent destruction of many already endangered species who call the mangroves home, such as the following:

  • American Crocodile
  • Atlantic Ridley Sea Turtle
  • Atlantic Salt Marsh Snake
  • Barbados Yellow Warbler
  • Brown Pelican
  • Hawksbill Sea Turtle
  • Eastern Indigo Snake
  • Key Deer
  • Peregrine Falcon
  • Southern Bald Eagle
  • West Indian Manatee

So… what can you do to help protect the mangroves?

While you will see the occasional soda can, most cans you will see are beer cans. This happens because many people are drinking on the beach or on their boats, and when they become drunk, they begin to give little regard to the environment (amongst other things). Before you start drinking, have a trash disposal plan. Make sure you bring bio-degradable trash bags with you to the beach or put some on your boat. If you have a cooler, put the empties in there so that when you return home, you can properly sort and dispose your recyclables.

To minimize plastic bottles in the mangroves, use a reusable water bottle that you will take home with you instead of throwing it into the abyss.

Abandon the out of sight, out of mind mentality. Nothing in this world just disappears, not your problems, and definitely not your trash.

Friends don’t let friends become enemies of the environment. If you see your friend engaging in behavior that is hazardous to the environment, say, “Hey, friend, why don’t you throw that can over here to me, and I’ll throw it away for you?” If you don’t, then you are guilty by association.

Think of the critters. Think of the baby chicks waiting for their parent to return to the nest with food, their cute little chirps, their eyes not yet open. Mama bird returns home, and as she goes to regurgitate the food into the hungry beaks of her chicklets, she chokes, she screams, she squawks. She falls over dead because she choked on a piece of trash, leaving her innocent little babies hungry and vulnerable to the mangrove predators.

 

Our lives will come and go, and our trash and litter will remain. Leave more to your legacy than plastic bottles and aluminum cans.

Let’s all work to protect the mangroves and its inhabitants.